Webinar on Research Communication

The USC Community Outreach and Engagement Program hosted a webinar today, “Communicating Research on Diesel and Your Health.” This webinar is the first in the Research in Action series being developed by the team. Over 100 participants joined the webinar to discuss the topic from the Moving Forward Network and the network on Partnerships for Environmental Public Health. This included community, public health, government, academic and research, air agency, legal, healthcare, and environmental justice organizations. The team looks forward to receiving suggestions on future webinar topics, to continue the discussions between research and community audiences.

View the diesel infographic here.

All the infographics that the Community Outreach and Engagement Program has developed can be found here on this website. 

Continue reading “Webinar on Research Communication”

SCEHSC Seminar Series: “Linking Exposure and Translational Science: A Community-Engaged Project near a Legacy Mine”

The SCEHSC Seminar Series presents
“Linking Exposure and Translational Science: A Community-Engaged Project near a Legacy Mine”
Paloma Beamer, PhD
Associate Professor, University of Arizona
College of Public Health, Community, Environment, and Policy Department
Friday, October 7, 2016
11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Soto Street I Building, Room 116
2001 North Soto Street
Los Angeles, CA 90032
If you would like to attend the FREE seminar, please email jacy@usc.edu Continue reading “SCEHSC Seminar Series: “Linking Exposure and Translational Science: A Community-Engaged Project near a Legacy Mine””

Intern Perspective: High school student impacted by local environmental justice issues

This summer the Community Outreach and Engagement team had the pleasure of hosting interns ranging from high school to masters level students. Maggie Shi, a high school senior from Yorba Linda, CA spend two months with us doing a variety of projects. A quick learner with a skill set that enabled her to tackle any assignment given to her, Maggie contributed in a variety of ways to the work that the Community Outreach staff and college interns did over the summer. At the end of her time with us, Maggie provided the following reflections on her experience.

I remember sitting at my desk on the first day of my internship, feeling excited, nervous, and a little out of place. As I looked around at all these unfamiliar faces around me, it dawned upon me that USC’s Division of Environmental Health probably didn’t take in many high school interns, and all the other college interns seemed much more knowledgeable and experienced than I was. Nevertheless, I knew how fortunate I was to be here, and I was still extremely excited. Thankfully, throughout the first few weeks, I was met with an incredible amount of support and enthusiasm from both my fellow interns and other employees in the office, and I quickly settled in. Continue reading “Intern Perspective: High school student impacted by local environmental justice issues”

Intern Perspective: Toxic chemicals in our homes, The pollution we can control

During Summer 2016, the Community Engagement team of the MADRES Environmental Health Disparities Center at USC began to host public health interns from Cal State LA. In response to a request that came from community groups in the LA area, interns began their work developing content and implementing workshops for local community groups around the theme of toxic chemicals in the homes. After conducting the first workshop in the series, interns Andrea Calderon and Giovanna Manson-Hing reflect upon their experience below. 

Every day people are exposed to hidden toxins whether it be at school, at work or even at home. Pollution is all around us and most times we can’t control it, but sometimes we can. One of the many ways we can control the pollution in our homes is through awareness of toxic chemicals found in cleaning products. Continue reading “Intern Perspective: Toxic chemicals in our homes, The pollution we can control”

SCEHSC Seminar Series: “Communicating Air Quality Data and Health Risk to the Public”

The SCEHSC Seminar Series presents

“Communicating Air Quality Data and Health Risk to the Public”

Jo Kay Ghosh, PhD

Health Effects Officer
South Coast Air Quality Management District

Friday, September 9, 2016
11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Soto Street I Building, Room 116
2001 North Soto Street
Los Angeles, CA 90032

If you would like to attend the FREE seminar, please email jacy@usc.edu

Dr. Jo Kay Ghosh is the Health Effects Officer at the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). She earned her doctorate in Epidemiology from the UCLA School of Public Health, with her work on air pollution and birth outcomes. She also conducted post-doctoral research at the USC Department of Preventive Medicine, examining the effects of air pollution on cancer risk. Previously, she worked at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, where she managed the Epidemiology and Research Unit of the Tuberculosis Control Program. 

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AirPollBrain and CEHC Presents: “Perinatal Metal Exposure and Neurodevelopment: Identifying Windows of Susceptibility”

The SCEHSC Seminar Series presents

“Perinatal Metal Exposure and Neurodevelopment: Identifying Windows of Susceptibility”

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

AirPollBrain Mini-Symposium: “Air Pollution and Adolescent Brain Development”

12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

Megan Horton, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Soto Street I Building, Room 116
2001 North Soto Street
Los Angeles, CA 90032

If you would like to attend the FREE seminar, please email jacy@usc.edu

Dr. Horton earned her doctoral degree in Environmental Health Sciences at Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. During her doctoral training, she gained expertise in the development and use of biological markers to measure prenatal and early life exposures to environmental toxicants, focusing mainly on residential exposure to pesticides. Subsequently, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Sergievsky Center for the Epidemiologic Study of Neurologic Diseases. The focus of this postdoc was to explore the use of brain imaging to investigate the impact of prenatal exposure to pesticides and secondhand smoke on neuropsychological and behavioral function throughout childhood. Dr. Horton was recently awarded an NIH career transition award and accepted a position as an Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Her current work combines her experience with biomarker development and neuroimaging to understand the mechanisms of neurodevelopmental toxicity following exposure to chemical mixtures.

Visitor parking at the Soto Street Building is limited. If you are planning to park at the Soto building during the seminar please contact Marissa Jacy (jacy@usc.edu) for more information. If you are a USC employee, please plan to take the free USC shuttle to our seminars whenever possible. Information about the USC shuttle can be found at http://transnet.usc.edu/index.php/bus-map-schedules/.

Special Seminar with Manish Arora, PhD: “Reconstructing Early Life Environment Exposures Using Tooth Matrix Biomarkers”

Manish Arora is Director of Exposure Biology and Division Chief of Environmental Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York. He graduated as a dentist from India, undertook postgraduate public health training in Australia and postdoctoral training at the Harvard School of Public Health. He has used a number of advanced analytical chemistry and nuclear beam methods, including laser ablation-coupled mass spectrometry, and synchrotron and proton-based x-ray emission for bio-imaging of hard and soft tissues. Dr. Arora has published his work in leading journals including Nature and Nature Reviews Neurology, and his work was recently recognized by the New Innovator Award from the NIEHS and NIH Director’s office.